English[edit]

A pair of low-heeled bed room slippers.

Etymology[edit]

slip +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slipper (plural slippers)

  1. A low smooth shoe that may be slipped on and off simply.
    Synonyms: babouche, pantofle
  2. Such a shoe meant for indoor use; a bed room or home slipper.

    Get off the bed, put in your slippers, and are available downstairs.

  3. (US, Hawaii) A flip-flop (kind of rubber sandal).
    Synonyms: flip-flop, sandal, thong
  4. An individual who slips.
    • 1955, Father John Doe (Father Ralph Pfau), Sobriety and Past, Hazelden Publishing (1997), →ISBN, web page 130:
      He’s a frequent “slipper,” however doesn’t appear to have enough intelligence upon which to ever construct everlasting sobriety and happiness.
    • 1995, Russ McDonald, “Intercourse, Lies, and Shakespearean Drama”, in Jeanne Addison Roberts (editor), half one among Peggy O’Brien (editor), Shakespeare Set Free: Instructing Twelfth Evening and Othello, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, web page 3:
      Nearly all human motion is liable to opposing interpretations, relying primarily upon distance: to take the acquainted case of the banana peel, the autumn is painful to the slipper, hilarious to the spectator throughout the road.
    • 2001, Barry M. Levenson, Habeas Codfish: Reflections on Meals and the Regulation, College of Wisconsin Press, →ISBN, web page 7:
      Slipping on a banana peel doesn’t imply massive bucks for the “slipper” if the “slippee” has an excellent legislation agency representing it.
  5. A sort of apron or pinafore for youngsters.
  6. A sort of brake or shoe for a wagon wheel.
  7. (engineering) A bit, often a plate, utilized to a sliding piece, to obtain put on and allow adjustment; a gib.
  8. A type of corporal punishment the place the buttocks are repeatedly struck with a plimsoll; “the slipper”.
    • 1981, Andrew Loudon, Staffroom mole leaks secret of his college’s beatings e-book, Every day Mail and Basic Belief, World Corporal Punishment Analysis
      “Mrs Marlene Foster [] , an opponent of the slipper, mentioned her son Gary had a backside “as purple as a beetroot” after he was punished for writing on desks. “
  9. (euphemistic) The plimsoll or health club shoe used on this type of punishment.
    • 2004, James Morgan, Stretching Ahead to Be taught, World Corporal Punishment Analysis
      “All lecturers had what was known as a ‘slipper’, however in actuality was a reduce down health club shoe designed for smacking our bottoms.”

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Adjective[edit]

slipper (comparative extra slipper, superlative most slipper)

  1. (out of date) slippery
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “Nouember. Aegloga Vndecima.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, OCLC 890162479:

      O! trustless state of earthly issues, and slipper hope / Of mortal males.

Verb[edit]

slipper (third-person singular easy current slippers, current participle slippering, easy previous and previous participle slippered)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To spank with a plimsoll as corporal punishment.
    • 1981, Andrew Loudon, Staffroom mole leaks secret of his college’s beatings e-book, Every day Mail and Basic Belief, World Corporal Punishment Analysis
      “One boy was slippered 5 occasions in 4 days for offences comparable to lacking detention, fooling about and being out of bounds.”

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

slipper

  1. current of slippe

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

slipper

  1. current tense of slippa.