English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English fortune, borrowed from Outdated French fortune, from Latin fortuna (destiny, luck). The plural kind fortunae meant “possessions”, which additionally gave fortune the which means of “riches”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortune (countable and uncountable, plural fortunes)

  1. Future, particularly favorable.

    She learn my fortune. Apparently I’ll have a great love life this week, however I’ll have a nasty week for cash.

    • 1647, Abraham Cowley, The Mistress (“My Destiny”):
      you, who males’s fortunes of their faces learn
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:

      [] his lordship was out of humour. That was the way in which Chollacombe described as knaggy an previous gager as ever Charles had had the ill-fortune to serve.

  2. A prediction or set of predictions about an individual’s future offered by a fortune teller.
  3. A small slip of paper with sensible or vaguely prophetic phrases printed on it, baked right into a fortune cookie.
  4. The arrival of one thing in a sudden or sudden method; probability; accident.
  5. Good luck.

    Fortune favors the courageous.

  6. One’s wealth; the sum of money one has; particularly, whether it is huge.

    He is amassed a small fortune working within the Center East.

    My huge fortune was a results of inheritance and inventory market nous.

    Her fortune is estimated at three million {dollars}.

  7. A big sum of money.

    That automobile have to be value a fortune! How might you afford it?

    • 2015 June 24, “High 10 Chinese language Knockoffs of Overseas Merchandise”, in China Uncensored[1], New Tang Dynasty Tv, New Tang Dynasty Tv, spoken by himself (Chris Chappell), 00:02:53 from the beginning:

      Why spend a small fortune on Puma when you would purchase Numa, Tuna or Pigg? And why purchase Adidas when you should purchase Adidos or Avivas? Nike, when there’s Nire or Hike? Calvin Klein, when clearly, Calvim Klain or Cavern Kernel are simply nearly as good? However bear in mind, after a great exercise, make sure to clear up with some Okay shampoo.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fortune (third-person singular easy current fortunes, current participle fortuning, easy previous and previous participle fortuned)

  1. (out of date, intransitive) To occur, happen. [14th-19th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew ch. 8:
      Then the heerdmen, fleed and went there methods into the cite, and tolde everythinge, and what had fortuned unto them that have been possessed of the devyls.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, “Night time 20”, in The E-book of the Thousand Nights and a Night time:

      It fortuned one evening that the Sultan purposed setting out on a journey subsequent morning

  2. To supply with a fortune.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Richardson to this entry?)
  3. To presage; to inform the fortune of.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Dryden to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Center French fortune, from Outdated French fortune, borrowed from Latin fortūna.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortune f (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune
    faire une fortune

    make a fortune
    faire fortune

    make a fortune

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fortune f

  1. plural of fortuna

Anagrams[edit]


Center English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated French fortune, from Latin fortuna.

Noun[edit]

fortune (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune (destiny, probability)

Descendants[edit]


Center French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated French fortune, borrowed from Latin fortuna.

Noun[edit]

fortune f (plural fortunes)

  1. fortune (destiny, probability)

Descendants[edit]


Noun[edit]

fortune (uncountable)

  1. good luck