English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman countour, from Previous French conteor (French comptoir), from Medieval Latin computātōrium, from Latin computō. Doublet of kontor and cantore.

Noun[edit]

counter (plural counters)

  1. One who counts.

    He is solely 16 months, however is already a great counter – he can depend to 100.

  2. A reckoner; somebody who collects knowledge by counting; an enumerator.
    • 2019, Li Huang; James Lambert, “One other Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Growth, DOI:10.1080/01434632.2019.1596115, web page 4:

      The essential thought is that the researcher conducting the transect (referred to as the counter or enumerator) walks alongside a set path at sure intervals (hourly, every day, month-to-month, and many others.) and tallies all situations of no matter is being surveyed.

  3. An object (now particularly a small disc) utilized in counting or preserving depend, or as a marker in video games, and many others.

    He rolled a six on the cube, so moved his counter ahead six areas.

  4. A telltale; a contrivance hooked up to an engine, printing press, or different machine, for the aim of counting the revolutions or the pulsations.
  5. (programming) A variable, reminiscence location, and many others. whose contents are incremented to maintain a depend.
  6. (Web) Successful counter.
  7. A desk or board on which cash is counted and over which enterprise is transacted

    He put his cash on the counter, and the shopkeeper put it within the until.

  8. A store tabletop on which items are examined, weighed or measured.
  9. In a kitchen, a floor, typically constructed into the wall and above a cupboard, designed for use for meals preparation.
  10. In a toilet, a floor, typically constructed into the wall and above a cupboard, which holds the washbasin.
  11. (curling) Any stone mendacity nearer to the middle than any of the opponent’s stones.
  12. (historic) The jail hooked up to a metropolis court docket; a compter.
    • 1590, John Greenwood, Christopher Bowman’s Petition
      He remaynes prisonner within the Counter in Woodstrete within the gap, by the contagiousing wherof he’s lyke to perishe
  13. (grammar) A category of phrase used together with numbers to depend objects and occasions, usually mass nouns. Though uncommon and non-compulsory in English (e.g. “20 head of cattle”), they’re quite a few and required in Chinese language, Japanese, and Korean.
Derived phrases[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous French contre, Anglo-Norman cuntre, each from Latin contra.

Adverb[edit]

counter (not comparable)

  1. Opposite, in opposition; in an other way.
  2. Within the improper means; opposite to the fitting course.
    a hound that runs counter
    • 2004, Bee Lavender, Maia Rossini, Mamaphonic: Balancing Motherhood and Different Artistic Acts
      She hated being pregnant; it ran counter to all the things she needed from her physique
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In line with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene v]:

      My lord, on your many courtesies I thanks.

    • 1615, George Sandys, The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. 1610, in 4 books
      which [darts] they by no means throw counter, however behind the flyer
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

counter (plural counters)

  1. One thing reverse or opposite to one thing else.
  2. (martial arts) A proactive defensive maintain or transfer in response to a maintain or transfer by one’s opponent.

    At all times know a counter to any maintain you attempt towards your opponent.

  3. (nautical) The overhanging stern of a vessel above the waterline, under and considerably ahead of the strict correct.
  4. The piece of a shoe or a boot across the heel of the foot (above the heel of the shoe/boot).
    • 1959, J. D. Salinger, Seymour: An Introduction:
      Seymour, sitting in an outdated corduroy armchair throughout the room, a cigarette going, carrying a blue shirt, grey slacks, moccasins with the counters damaged down, a shaving lower on the aspect of his face []
  5. (music) Various type of contra Previously used to designate any below half which served for distinction to a principal half, however now used as equal to countertenor.
  6. The breast of a horse; that a part of a horse between the shoulders and below the neck.
  7. (typography) The enclosed or partly closed unfavorable area of a glyph.
  8. (out of date) An encounter.

Verb[edit]

counter (third-person singular easy current counters, current participle countering, easy previous and previous participle countered)

  1. To contradict, oppose.
  2. (boxing) To return a blow whereas receiving one, as in boxing.
  3. To take motion in response to; to reply.
    • 2012 December 14, Simon Jenkins, “We mustn’t overreact to North Korea boys’ toys”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], quantity 188, quantity 2, web page 23:

      David Cameron insists that his newest communications knowledge invoice is “important to counter terrorism”. But terror is mayhem. It’s no menace to freedom. That menace is from counter-terror, from ministers capitulating to securocrats.

  4. (transitive, out of date) To come across.
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

counter (not comparable)

  1. Opposite or opposing
    His carrying a knife was counter to my plan.
    Synonyms: reverse, contrasted, opposed, antagonistic, antagonistic
    • a. 1865, Isaac Taylor, Thoughts in Kind
      Innumerable information testifying the counter precept.
Derived phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English counter.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑu̯n.tər/
  • Hyphenation: coun‧ter

Noun[edit]

counter m (plural counters)

  1. (mainly sports activities, particularly soccer) counter-attack, counter
    Het thuisteam scoorde vanuit de counter.

    The house group scored throughout a counter-attack.
    Synonym: tegenaanval

Associated phrases[edit]


Previous French[edit]

Verb[edit]

counter

  1. Late Anglo-Norman spelling of conter

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The types that may usually finish in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Previous French conjugation varies considerably by date and by area. The next conjugation must be handled as a information.